Glass, Recycling, Waste Management, and Environment

In the age of renewable energy and green technologies, we don’t stop speaking about recycling. The global striving towards “green” technologies is justified by the growing scarcity of natural resources, environmental pollution and global warming, as well as the simple desire to keep the planet intact for the future generations. It has become so popular to talk about recycling that the message itself has lost its meaning. Today, one of the basic questions asked by international authorities and U.S. glass manufacturers is whether at all the topic of recycling can be considered as relevant and real. In other words, it is time to reduce glass waste, or is just a waste of time?

We at our Arizona glass company believe that waste is one of the strongest signs of human development on the planet. Waste is also the sign of our existence. Every day, in everything we do, we create tons of waste, including glass. However, not all societies are equally susceptible to waste problems. Actually, many countries have been quite successful managing their waste and reducing its scope. Glass repair Chandler is one of the few glass companies, which believes that waste cannot be eliminated, but it can be managed and controlled. This is why we thoroughly monitor our industrial processes and provide employees with regular training to avoid excessive waste.

Back to waste control, our home glass repair company believes that recycling by itself cannot solve the problems of the glass industry. The problem is not in the amount of waste generated by glass enterprises. The problem is in the attitudes towards waste and waste elimination. Everything begins with preventing waste production; waste elimination comes next. In the glass industry, as well as in any other field of human performance, prevention of waste is a foundation for effective waste management. The less waste it is here the fewer resources we will need to eliminate the emerging glass waste.

Of course, the main question facing glass repair Gilbert with regard to waste prevention is how exactly it can happen. The answer is easy: for example, reusable glass containers are much more effective in terms of our “green” goals than more traditional glass bottles. Disposed window glass can also be processed and re-used in new glass structures. We advocate for the development of such re-use programs, as we want to improve the quality of our glass services without damaging the environment. Our goal here is to balance our business and environmental objectives, giving our customers a strong glass product while also contributing to environmental protection through effective waste management.

Another important principle is that of disposal. In the glass industry, disposal used to be a popular practice. However, today, we see that disposal should be a measure of last resort. In other words, we have decided that glass waste is to be disposed, only when it cannot be processed. With modern technologies, almost every type of glass waste can be successfully processed and re-used. This is why we expect that disposal will soon become outdated.
What we think is that our transition to “green” glass industry practices presents major opportunities for the development of all businesses in this field. However, this is hardly possible without effective legislative frameworks.

We can see that Europe has already become more flexible towards glass industry players. Many materials are recognized as permanently effectively, meaning that they can be reused an infinite number of times without losing their quality. For example, 70% of glass bottles are currently recycled, and glass manufacturers are ambitious to be able to recycle the remaining 30% in the nearest future. As a result, we create new jobs and, at the same time, protect our environment. We at our window glass repair company are confident that the glass industry has no future without waste elimination and management. We just have to become more attentive to the routine processes and their potential impacts on the environment.

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